Initiating breast milk supply

Though breastfeeding is natural, the technique is a learned skill and it may take time and patience for new mums and their babies to master it. As they become more practised, breastfeeding will become easier and more pleasurable.

Initiating breastfeeding and breast milk supply

  • Mothers are more likely to stop breastfeeding when they feel their milk supply is inadequate
  • Mothers who have lactation risk factors often require extra support to establish their milk supply
  • Early identification of women with risk factors for delayed secretory activation (lactogenesis II) is vital
  • The first hours and days after birth are critical for mother and infant to effectively start to build milk supply

Starting things right

  • Effectively “switching on” the breasts from the beginning (initiation) is required for mothers to achieve adequate milk volumes
  • Getting it  right from the beginning has a significant impact on a mother’s long-term milk production

Our step-by-step ‘Initiation’ infographic shows how mothers can get their milk supply off to a good start to enable exclusive breastfeeding or an exclusive human milk diet if breastfeeding is not possible.

Maternal risk factors for poor milk supply

  • There are several risk factors which may affect whether a mother can exclusively breastfeed
  • Awareness of risk factors can highlight a need for extra early breastfeeding support
  • Early intervention is essential for at-risk mothers to help them achieve their long-term breastfeeding goals

This infographic on lactation risk factors provides more information on evidence-based clinical steps needed to support these mothers.

White paper: Improving delayed lactogenesis and suppressed lactation in at-risk mothers

This white paper gives you an overview of how to identify mothers:

  • at risk for delayed onset of milk production
  • with multiple risk factors
  • whose infants are not breastfeeding effectively

Download the white paper on improving delayed lactogenesis.

Webinar: Getting it right - Professor Diane Spatz, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN

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