Medela finger feeder

FingerFeeder

The FingerFeeder enables small volumes of liquid to be offered to the baby. The delivery of colostrum, human milk or supplements can be carefully controlled. The soft silicone material of the device offers a gentle feeding experience. Finger feeding appears to be supportive of breastfeeding rates in the hospital. The FingerFeeder is available for hospitals only.

Finger feeding: reinforcing natural sucking reflexes

The Medela FingerFeeder is designed for babies who require small amounts of human milk (especially their own mum’s colostrum) or other necessary supplements.

Finger feeding may be supportive to reinforce the baby’s natural sucking reflexes.

The caregiver offers the FingerFeeder by attaching it to a syringe, placing a finger in the baby’s mouth, then sliding the FingerFeeder along their finger and into the baby’s mouth. When the caregiver feels the baby attempting to suck and create a vacuum on their finger, they depress the syringe and deliver some liquid. In this way the caregiver can reinforce the baby’s natural sucking reflexes.

Benefits

Benefits of the FingerFeeder

The FingerFeeder is designed for offering small amounts of colostrum, human milk or other necessary supplements to babies.

The FingerFeeder is made of soft silicone and can be reused after it has been cleaned in accordance with the instructions for use.

 

  • Encourages the baby’s natural sucking behaviour
  • Helps develop the baby’s oral feeding skills
  • Allows gentle feeding and careful control of the delivery of colostrum and human milk
  • The soft silicone material offers a gentle feeding experience
Useful products
Downloads
More information
More information
Medela advice: breastfeeding a special needs baby

Feeding a special needs baby

Read more

The benefits of breastfeeding

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References

Oddy, W.H. & Glenn, K. Implementing the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative: The role of finger feeding. Breastfeed Rev 11, 5-10 (2003).

Marmet, C. & Shell, E. Training neonates to suck correctly. MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs 9, 401-407 (1984).